11.25.2005

Birthday Letter

Dear Ben,

I can't call you on your birthday so I have to write. Wherever you are now, I'm sure you're surfing the Web if at all possible.

I think about you all the time. I try to picture your face. Often we would be driving somewhere and I would turn and study the side of your face. You would wear that heavy grey polar fleece pullover and orange TiVo cap. You had a cute long nose and those rectangular glasses. I liked when your hair was longer and curling a little. You were getting a few silver hairs at your temples. I tried to picture what you would look like as you got more grey.

I try to remember our conversations. You would bring me up to speed on your friends and family -- their comings and goings -- and show me your old home movies. I already felt as if I knew everyone. Or at least, I knew their bar mitzvahs. You made that movie of your cat while you were home on break from college because you were pretty certain that was the last time you were going to see him. That was one long movie. You followed him around the yard when he wasn't doing very much, just loafing and poking around. And that turned out to be the last time you saw him.

Many people have noted with regret that we have so few photos and movies of you. You took reams of photos and hours of video, but you always were behind the camera. I don't even have a picture of the two of us. Everything that happened between us, with a few exceptions, was just us -- and now I'm carrying it alone. I have to talk/write/rant about you just to help bear it, even though I know you would be terribly embarrassed. But you knew what you were getting into with me. You read the whole blog before we even met.

You could dish pretty well yourself, though. When we first met you boasted about your colorful stories, and I remember a lot of them now. Generally your full-blown stories about people would fall into two categories -- People who Made Good Decisions and People who Made Bad Decisions. People who made good decisions, such as being the first to move to a particular up-and-coming town, often had been recipients of your advice. People who made bad decisions often had ignored advice from you -- buying a substandard appliance, for example -- and were punished with some kind of trouble, such as a defective unit, as a result.

Either way, you gave a lot of advice. When I was mad at you I theorized you saw everyone as projects that needed your improvements, and that you mostly related to people by criticizing them. In calmer moments I realized that you didn't criticize to be mean. You were just ridiculously informed about an insane number of things and were trying to help people out, freely dispensing your opinion whether it was welcome or not. And whatever it was, usually you were right.

I don't think I ever saw you mean. You could be smug; frosty; imperious; gracious; tender; passionate. But not mean.

I still haven't renovated my kitchen, but I'm holding on to the sketch you made. You sent it to me the first week we were dating. In my book, that's a no-money-back-you're-getting-laid guarantee.

You tried to give me music advice once. What a disaster. I had been having difficult gigs and you were videotaping them all. The night you tried to play a show back to me and make running commentary -- like "why don't you smile more at the audience?" -- I almost knocked your block off. It was the only time I told you to go fuck yourself and really meant it. But you seemed to like it when I got sassy.

You continued to try to be helpful. We even tried an album cover shoot in Central Park, scouting around to find the spot where Nina Simone sat for the cover of her first record. We climbed giant, icy "keep off" rocks and froze our asses sitting on them to get a good shot of me with the pond and bridge behind. Days later, you produced another pearl: "I think your record cover should be . . . the outline of your naked body." Good grief, Ben.

Last year on your birthday we met up at Columbus Circle. Your instructions from me were to wear a suit that fit. I spotted you from across the plaza -- you looked so tall and handsome in your suit and trenchcoat. You were taller than everybody. It was not too cold; holiday lights were up; the Salvation Army lady was there with her bell and kettle. When we kissed hello I felt so nervous.

Between our fancy dinner and jazz at Lincoln Center, we strolled through Borders in the Time Warner Center -- you pointed out Weird N.J. magazine. Why do I keep remembering that now? We spent the rest of the weekend watching Lord of the Rings and debauching. Afterward, you didn't call me for days. God I was furious -- but that did result in our setting up a schedule. And that worked.

I remember your signature touches. You would bring tea and cookies to me on the couch and plop your legs in my lap. Self-righteously, like a huge cat. As we rode the bus in the morning, you would plant your hand on my knee and squeeze. You would TiVo stuff for us to watch together. Weeknights were nice and slow with you. It shocks me now to realize how much of a steady presence you were.

Sometimes I get hysterical wondering where the hell you've disappeared to. I force myself to remember the night on the pier, as you were losing strength, and then later as your soul left your body. I tell myself this was the end of the story. Of course, that's impossible. Your story is carried on by everyone who cared about you. Ed wrote a beautiful remembrance of you.

It's really cold tonight so I'm pulling out your down comforter. Saro threw up on the green blanky and I need something warm.

I miss you, Ben. You are never far from my thoughts. Now go fuck yourself.

Love, Erica

21 comments:

Jon Sobel said...

Wow, that's one of the most beautiful things I've ever read.

Anonymous said...

Indeed, beautiful. what a loss.

Anonymous said...
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Anonymous said...

I just read this in "Other People's Love Letters" and thought to myself how wonderful it would be to read this about myself. I think it is absolutely marvelous, beautiful, and romantic. I could picture all the events in your letter as two wonderful people I will never meet experiencing feelings and moments that I could only imagine for that second I read them. I'm glad that I could read something in a book and then be able to personally tell the author how great it was! Amazing!

Erica said...

Thanks, anonymous! That means a lot to me.

Anonymous said...

I read this in "Other People's Love Letters" as well, and I had a similar reaction. I had to look this blog up to tell you how beautiful and touching this letter is.

Erica said...

Thank you!

Anonymous said...

Another response from a reader of other people's love letters:

Although I thoroughly enjoyed every letter, text message, e-mail, and note included in the book, I think the one that resonated the most for me and my life, was yours. It was beautiful, eloquent, and striking. So thank you, it meant more than you know.

Erica said...

Hugs to you.

Anonymous said...

I recently reopened my copy of "Other People's Love Letters" and it was your letter I opened to. You write beautifully and the emotion and depth conveyed in your letter is staggering. It took all I had not to cry for you and for the love you lost and I hope we all can find a love like yours in this lifetime. Thank you for helping me believe.

Anonymous said...

I also read it in other peoples love letters. It is so beautiful. It touched me. It made me cry.

Erica said...

Thanks for reaching out. [Hug]

Melanie said...

I also read this in "other people´s love letters" and i just had to find your blog. I cried when I read your letter. This so touching, beautiful, romantic...
Thank you so much for this!

Hugs,
Melanie

Aubrey said...

I cried and cried after reading your letter (and I'm not even a crier so this must mean something), cyber-stalking you to find your blog, and also reading your "Eulogy" to Ben. I think that it's absolutely, incredibly beautiful. I am intrigued. I can't help but wanting to know more and more about it.

Erica said...

Thanks so so much. Aubrey, it's so funny, I identify with your impulse of "wanting to know more" . . . i've felt that way so many times about various people and situations. But when it's your own life, you see how something -- even a huge event, a trauma -- just kind of folds itself back into your life, becomes a part of you. And it just becomes part of the ever-changing present.

I find this process hard to reconcile with the fact that Ben's "present" no longer exists (at least, not in this world). It's trite and solipsistic-sounding, but I have gained so much just by keeping him and others in my heart, and remembering their lessons.

Anonymous said...

Hi, I read this on Other People's Love Letters as well. (The book finally came today and I couldn't help but read it right when I got it!) I just wanted to tell you that your piece was very descriptive and the way you wrote it allowed me to picture all those events in my mind. It's a lovely entry and I'm saddened that your friend, Ben, is not here to read it. I know he would've absolutely loved it like I, and all the readers above me, have.

KaBooMx said...

I just wanted to tell you I was touched by your letter. =[

S. Little said...

LOL ok so I was totally cyber-stalking you.... your piece in the book was really beautiful. At first I didn't realize what had happened, but as I read the story behind it, I began to tear up. You are incredible and I wish you all the best.

lauren said...

I also read this in the book "Other People's Love Letters" and just had to find it. When I read it, I got teary eyed. I liked it very much. You put so much voice and emotion into it that I felt like I could connect, but of course I cant truly connect. However, it was a beautiful writing.

Tirzah said...

Congrats on having this wonderful letter published in the book, I read it months ago and as I was re-reading it I decided that I should come and find you and tell you what a fantastic letter this is. Great writing! :)

Kelsey said...

I (like everyone else) read this in "Other People's Love Letters" and it made me cry..I had to find your blog to see if its really here. You are a beautiful writer, and I hope you've found happiness again :)